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CLAVIERS BAROQUES News Desk -- Gallery 345's 2011/2011 Concert Season

September 04 , 2010 -- Great music, great musicians in Parkdale starting *next week* -- a letter from our good neighbour up the street, Edward Epstein of Gallery 345, 345 Sorauren Ave, Toronto, ON:

Friends, Torontonians, Canadians, lend me your ears! Sept 12 is the opening night of a new season of musical performance at Gallery 345. I need your help in getting  the word out about the wonderful performances that take place at the Gallery. Please forward this invitation to friends who you think would be interested in hearing some of the best pianists and musicians in the city. Help me grow the audience for Gallery 345. Help support a community of musicians and composers who have chosen this wonderful path to fulfillment.

Many thanks,

Edward Epstein

gallery345@gmail.com
www.gallery345.com

A few of the upcoming concerts, check the gallery website for complete and updated schedule:

The Art of the Piano: Duo Jazz Piano Improv with Robi Botos and Dave Restivo
Sunday Sept 12 at 8:00
$20; $15 Senior; $10 Student

Dave Restivo is one of Canada's most respected and influential jazz artists. He is a 3-time winner of the National Jazz Awards' Pianist of the Year Award, and is listed in the current edition of Canadian Who's Who. He is well known for his work with Rob McConnell's Boss Brass and Tentet, the Mike Murley Quintet, and legendary songwriter Marc Jordan. He has also performed and recorded with Dave Holland, Kenny Wheeler, John Abercrombie, Jerry Bergonzi, Mel Torme, Pat LaBarbera, Ingrid Jensen, Christine Jensen, Molly Johnson, Moe Koffman, Joe LaBarbera, Mark Whitfield, Marcus Belgrave, Joey Baron, Curtis Fuller, Stacy Rowles, Jane Bunnett, Phil Dwyer, Tim Hagans, Steve Kirby, Jeff Hamilton, Alex Acuna, Gene Bertoncini, Phillip Harper, Don Thompson, Ed Bickert, Guido Basso, P.J. Perry, Trudy Desmond, Joe Lovano, Judi Silvano, Dave Pietro, Owen Howard, John Hollenbeck, Ratzo Harris, Sheila Jordan, Jay Clayton, Donny McCaslin, Metalwood, Charles McPherson, Dave Young, Norman Marshall Villeneuve, Memo Acevedo, Dave Valentin, Luis Conte, and many others.

Dave has served on the music faculty at the Banff Centre for the Arts and St. Francis Xavier University, and currently teaches at Humber College and the University of Toronto.

"...quite simply one of the finest jazz pianists of his generation that Canada can boast of..." -Roger Levesque, Edmonton Journal

Born into a musical Romani (Gypsy) family in Nyiregyhaza, Hungary, Robi began his musical career when he was just a child, playing drums, and percussion with his father and two brothers. It was at age seven when Robi first took up piano, the instrument with which he is making his mark.

Botos, who immigrated to Toronto, Canada in 1998, has been recognized worldwide for his piano talent. Given his relative youth, he's still considered by some standards to be "an emerging talent", but has already won high ranking prizes in piano competitions in: Paris, France; Belgium; Long Beach, California; Montreux, Switzerland (which 
led to an opening slot for Oscar Peterson the following year); and this month in Jacksonville, Florida. In Toronto, he's received the National Jazz Awards Keyboardist of the Year title (2007), the 2007 NOW Award for Best Jazz Artist, and a JUNO nomination for his 2006 record, "One Take".

Robi Botos is a regular member of legendary drummer Archie Alleyne's bebop outfit Kollage, and has also been featured with Roberta Gambarini, Joey DeFrancesco, Peter Appleyard, Pat LaBarbera, James Blood Ulmer, Jackie Richardson, Dave Young, Norman Marshall Villenueve, Michael Brecker, Toots Thielemans, Guido Basso, and 
Avishai Cohen, to name a few. He is also a composer and leader of his own group, performing frequently with his brother Frank Botos, a drummer who also calls Toronto home.


Special Concert:
Henry Grimes / Jane Bunnett / Andrew Cyrille

Monday Sept 13 at 8:00
$25 all seats; $10 for students

HENRY GRIMES, BASS

As a child, Grimes took up the violin, then began playing tuba, English horn, percussion, and finally the double bass at age 13 or 14, while he was in high school. Grimes furthered his musical studies at Juilliard, and established a reputation as a versatile bassist in the mid 1950s. He recorded or performed with saxophonists Gerry Mulligan and Sonny Rollins, pianist Thelonious Monk, singer Anita O'Day, clarinetist Benny Goodman and many others. At a time when bassist Charles Mingus was experimenting with a second bass player in his band, Grimes was the person he selected for the job.

Gradually growing interested in free jazz, Grimes performed with most of the music's important names, including pianist Cecil Taylor, trumpeter Don Cherry, saxophonists Steve Lacy, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, and Albert Ayler. He released one album, The Call as a trio leader for the ESP-Disk record label in 1965. The album features Perry Robinson on clarinet and Tom Price on drums and is considered to be of a great quality representative of his career.

In the late 1960s, Grimes career came to a halt after his move to California. It was commonly assumed Grimes had died; he was listed as such in several jazz reference works. Then Marshall Marrotte, a social worker and jazz fan, set out to discover Grimes's fate once and for all. In 2003, he found Grimes alive but nearly destitute, without a bass to play, renting a tiny apartment in Los Angeles, California, writing poetry and doing odd jobs to support himself. He had fallen out of touch with the jazz world and was unaware Albert Ayler had died, but was eager to perform again.

Word spread of Grimes's 'resurrection', and some musicians and fans offered their help. Bassist William Parker donated a bass (nicknamed "Olive Oil", for its distinctive greenish color) and with David Gage's help had it shipped from New York to Los Angeles, and others assisted with travel expenses and arranging performances. Grimes's return was featured in The New York Times and on National Public Radio. A documentary film is planned, as is a biography.

Grimes has made up for lost time: In 2003 he performed at over two dozen music festivals or other appearances. Grimes received a returning hero's welcome at the free jazz-oriented Vision Festival, and is teaching lessons and workshops for bassists. His November 2003 appearance on trumpeter Dennis González' Nile River Suite was the bassist's second recording in more than 35 years. In 2004 he recorded as leader with David Murray and Hamid Drake; and in 2005 with guitarist Marc Ribot, who also wrote an introduction to Grimes' first book, Signs Along the Road, published in March 2007 by Buddy's Knife Jazzedition in Cologne, Germany, a collection of Grimes' poetry, in which he presents his selection of entries from thousands of pages of his writings. Also in 2007, Henry Grimes recorded with drummer Rashied Ali, with whom he has played a half-dozen duo concerts and a trio with Marilyn Crispell, and in 2008 with Paul Dunmall and Andrew Cyrille, a co-leader trio called the Profound Sound Trio, among others.

In many venues around New York and on tour in the U.S., Canada, and 23 countries in Europe and the Far East, working mostly as a leader since 2003, Henry Grimes has been making music with Rashied Ali, Marshall Allen, Fred Anderson, Marilyn Crispell, Ted Curson, Andrew Cyrille, Bill Dixon, Dave Douglas, Andrew Lamb, Joe Lovano, William Parker, Cecil Taylor (with whom Henry resumed playing in October, 2006 after forty years), John Tchicai, and others. In the past few years, Henry has also held a number of residencies and offered workshops and master classes on major campuses (including Berklee College of Music, Hamilton College for the Arts, New England Conservatory, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, the University of Gloucestershire at Cheltenham, and several more). He has released several new recordings, made his professional debut on a second instrument (the violin) at the age of 70, and has been creating illustrations to accompany his new recordings and publications. He has received many honors in recent years, including four Meet the Composer grants and a grant from the Acadia Foundation. He can be heard on more than 80 recordings on various labels, including Atlantic, Ayler Records, Blue Note, Columbia, ESP-Disk, ILK Music, Impulse!, JazzNewYork Productions, Pi Recordings, Porter Records, Prestige, Riverside, and Verve. Henry Grimes is now a resident of New York City and has a busy schedule of performances, clinics, and international tours.

JANE BUNNETT, SOPRANO SAX AND FLUTE

Jane Bunnett the soprano saxophonist, flutist and bandleader, has built her career at the crossroads between Cuban music and jazz. Twice nominated for Grammy Awards (Best Latin Jazz Recording 2002 for Alma de Santiago and 2003 for Cuban Odyssey), a fixture of nominations for Canada’s Juno Awards, and winner at Canada’s Urban Music Awards for Best Global Recording in 2003 for Cuban Odyssey, Toronto’s own jazz virtuoso has turned her bands into showcases for the finest musical talent from Canada, the United States and Cuba.

Honoured with an appointment to the Order of Canada in 2004, Jane Bunnett is truly one of Canada’s most valuable artistic resources.

ANDREW CYRILLE, PERCUSSION

Cyrille was born in Brooklyn, New York into a family with a mother from Haiti. He began studying science at St. John's University, but was already playing jazz in the evenings and switched his studies to the Juilliard School.

His first professional engagement was as an accompanist of singer Nellie Lutcher and he had an early recording session with Coleman Hawkins. Trumpeter Ted Curson introduced him to pianist Cecil Taylor when Cyrille was 18.

He joined the Cecil Taylor unit in 1964 and stayed for about 10 years and eventually performed drum duos with Milford Graves. In addition to recording as a bandleader, he has recorded and/or performed with musicians such as David Murray, Irène Schweizer, Marilyn Crispell, Carla Bley, Butch Morris and Reggie Workman among others.


Quiet People Collective. Singer/songwriters from Saskatchewan:
Zachary Lucky and The Bravest Ghost (Sean Craib-Petkau)

Thurs Sept 16 at 8:00
$20; $15 Snr; $10 Student

Zachary Lucky is quite possibly one of the hardest working singer songwriters to come out of Central Canada in the past ten years. Having three releases under his belt and on the brink of a new full length album due out this August, and all by the age of 21 - Zachary is definitely an artist to watch. Zachary has found his niche as a touring artist. Having crossed the country twice in the past six months, playing to crowds as big as 500 and as small as 10 - Zachary does not seem to be slowing down anytime soon.www.zacharylucky.com (Saskatoon, SK)

The Bravest Ghost, solo moniker of singer songwriter Sean Craib-Petkau, found it's footing in a rushed and confusing move to the troubled city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Unemployed, starving, and with an alcohol-soaked tongue, he began to dig deep inside of himself for inspiration never before discovered. With both internal and external struggles finally put to paper, Craib-Petkau returned home to Yorkton, Saskatchewan in January 2010 to record this new collection of songs.www.myspace.com/thebravestghost (Yorkton, SK)

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last updated September 5, 2010